The Latest

Jul 18, 2014 / 42 notes

everythingcentralasia:

Qurutob (Қурутоб) is Tajikistan’s national dish consisting of layers of fatir (Tajik flaky bread), qurut (dried sour yogurt), water/oil, fried onions, tomatoes, peppers served in tabaq (hand-carved wooden plate) and eaten with hands.

The story behind Qurutob is that since Tajikistan is largely a mountainous region, people lived in high altitudes, and winters were though with temperatures below zero, very little to no food was available. In order to survive through these harsh winters, people stored food such as flour, dried sour yoghurt, vegetables, nuts, beans. They prepared food from what was available at the time: women would prepare bread in tandoor (clay oven), dried sour yoghurt (qurut), fried onions, added oil and qurutob was ready. This dish would provide them with good enough energy to make it through the day. In summers, the dish would be topped with fresh vegetables such as tomatoes and peppers. Today, it is a dish that unites people. What makes Qurutob truly unique from other dishes is that it is eaten with a group of people, such as family members, friends, etc. rather than eaten alone.

Jul 15, 2014 / 137 notes

Iftars in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

(via ajnabiii)

Jul 4, 2014 / 97 notes

French desserts round up: Paris-Brest, Café liégeois, Beignet, Mille-feuille, Palmier, Croquembouche, Macaron, Religieuses, Pêche Melba, Canelé.

Jul 4, 2014 / 26 notes

arctic-revenge:

Romanian Desserts - [FrenchSpanish, Swedish, German, Polish, Italian, English]

[ Amandine, Pască, Sfințișori, Cornuleţe, Alivenci, Plăcintă, Joffre Cake, Papanași.]

coffeewithajla:

Turkish delights (llokuma in Turkish & Albanian) for iftar. (Note: llokuma in Albanian language can also refer to another dish, made from dough).
Obviously you can eat Turkish delights whenever your heart desires, but it has become a bit of a family Ramadan tradition for us to always serve some for iftar. It’s one of those little things reminding me that “Ramadan is here”.
Jul 4, 2014 / 90 notes

coffeewithajla:

Turkish delights (llokuma in Turkish & Albanian) for iftar. (Note: llokuma in Albanian language can also refer to another dish, made from dough).

Obviously you can eat Turkish delights whenever your heart desires, but it has become a bit of a family Ramadan tradition for us to always serve some for iftar. It’s one of those little things reminding me that “Ramadan is here”.

(via peribacasi)

fotoblogturkey:

İçli Köfte, ( Turkish meatball) Turkish Cuisine
Jun 30, 2014 / 106 notes

fotoblogturkey:

İçli Köfte, ( Turkish meatball) Turkish Cuisine

Jun 30, 2014 / 15,225 notes

sara21h:

فطور رمضان حول العالم

Breakfast Ramadan around the world

Jun 28, 2014
salvodaze:

Güllaç. No idea why this is the Ramadan trademark dessert, but I lurve it. Sheets of cornstarch softened with milk & sugar (and as the name suggests in Turkish, rose water - which I omit) and stacked on top of each other with a layer of (typically) nuts in between.
Jun 27, 2014 / 29 notes

salvodaze:

Güllaç. No idea why this is the Ramadan trademark dessert, but I lurve it. Sheets of cornstarch softened with milk & sugar (and as the name suggests in Turkish, rose water - which I omit) and stacked on top of each other with a layer of (typically) nuts in between.

(via solipsistictendencies)

Jun 25, 2014 / 3 notes

Please don’t take the captions off our posts. Thank you.